Chill with a Book Awards for Independent Authors

Wednesday, 14 November 2018

The One That I Want by Lynne Shelby


The One That I Want
has RECEIVED a


Chill with a Book READERS’ Award


'Warm-hearted, romantic, and beautifully written' - Kate Field, author of The Winter That Made Us

The latest sparkling romance from the award-winning author of French Kissing.
When Lucy Ashford lands a top job at a leading theatrical agency in London, work mixes with pleasure, as she literally falls into the arms of Hollywood heartthrob Daniel Miller.

Handsome, charming and irresistible, Daniel is just what unlucky-in-love Lucy needs, and she is quickly drawn into his glittering celebrity lifestyle. But can she tame the A-list bad boy or is she just one more girl in Daniel s long line of conquests?

And then there’s up-and-coming actor Owen Somers, fiercely talented but as yet uncast in a starring role. After she takes him onto the agency’s books, Owen and Lucy's friendship slowly grows. If she looks closely, Lucy's leading man might be right before her very eyes...

Genre:  Romance
Approx pages:  274


The One That I Want was read and evaluated by Chill's readers against the following...

Were the characters strong and engaging?
 Was the book well written?
Did the story / plot have you turning the page to find out what happened next?
Was the ending satisfying?
Would you recommend to someone who reads this kind of story?







Wednesday, 7 November 2018

A Chill Wind Off The Tyne by John Orton


A Chill Wind Off The Tyne
has RECEIVED a


Chill with a Book READERS’ Award


A Chill Wind off the Tyne first takes you back to the early 1900s in the Tyneside town of South Shields (Sooth Sheels to the locals). Amin and Ali, Yemeni seamen, arrive on the quayside and feel the bite of the north-east wind. The influx of the Arabs has begun. Their story is one of many that takes you from bare foot street urchins, fish and vegetable hawkers, young lads working in the shipyards and pits, to the years of the great depression after the Great War: the pit lockouts of 1921 and 1926; the race riots of 1919 and 1930 when Arab and white sailors fought in the streets. Seen through the eyes of characters who some readers may have met in the Five Stone Steps (the memoirs of Station Sergeant Thomas ‘Jock’ Gordon), the tales of life and love, of boozas, and pitch and toss schools, of bare knuckle fights in the back lanes, of tripe, brawn and cow heel pie (‘well, when you were hungry you’d eat owt’), recreate the lives of ordinary working folk, when people survived hardship by sticking together. Old photos are used as illustrations so that you can see ‘auld Sooth Sheels’ for yourselves.
“Sometimes the truth is stranger than fiction but in Chill Wind off the Tyne John Orton manages to mix them in ways that dramatise working-class lives during the 1930s. He is the Catherine Cookson for our times – and far better on the social history.”

Robert Colls – Professor of Cultural History, De Montfort University, Author of ‘George Orwell: English Rebel’

“In this third volume in John Orton's brilliantly fictionalised account of life in the early twentieth century North East, he presents the struggles and triumphs of working people in the eventful years of war and Depression between 1900 and 1940. This is forgotten social history retold with gripping authenticity.”

John Gray, Author of ‘Straw Dogs: thoughts on humans and other animals’

Genre:  Historical Fiction
Approx pages:  303


A Chill Wind Off The Tyne was read and evaluated by Chill's readers against the following...

Were the characters strong and engaging?
 Was the book well written?
Did the story / plot have you turning the page to find out what happened next?
Was the ending satisfying?
Would you recommend to someone who reads this kind of story?







Tuesday, 6 November 2018

House Under the Hill by Rachel V Knox


House Under the Hill
has RECEIVED a


Chill with a Book READERS’ Award


A house built high on the moor,
A golden age, ended by war,
A house left empty, falling to ruin.

During the Edwardian period, the wealthy Kearleys entertained important guests at their summer home on the moors; enjoying lavish parties showcasing the house and its views of the mountains.

By the 1950s the house is falling apart, assailed by bleak winds on its moorland summit, and the last family to live there are preparing to move out. Their plans are stalled when, during a snowstorm, their youngest child, Alis, goes missing. Her siblings know more than they are letting on and try to keep their sister’s disappearance secret.

They must search for Alis in the ‘other-house’, the dark and empty part of the mansion, and it is here that they will find mysterious remnants of the original family.

Gwylfa Hiraethog, was built and rebuilt in North Wales, between 1898–1913, and derelict by the 1950s. This is the story of the first and last families to live at the house, the rise and fall of a golden age, and the onset of war and decline; played out against the backdrop of the house on the hill.


Genre:  Historical Fiction / Family Life
Approx pages:  222


House Under the Hill was read and evaluated by Chill's readers against the following...

Were the characters strong and engaging?
 Was the book well written?
Did the story / plot have you turning the page to find out what happened next?
Was the ending satisfying?
Would you recommend to someone who reads this kind of story?






Monday, 5 November 2018

Shadow of the Raven by Millie Thom


Shadow of the Raven

has RECEIVED a


Chill with a Book READERS’ Award



"Historical fiction at its best.'

By the mid ninth century, Danish raids on Anglo-Saxon kingdoms have escalated. Several bands even dare to overwinter on the coastal islands, particularly those at the mouth of the Thames, where the kingdoms of Wessex and Mercia border each other.

The kings of these lands must put past enmity- aside and take the first steps towards unity; steps they see as vital in the face of this newfound threat to their lands . . .

Alfred of Wessex and Eadwulf of Mercia are the sons of kings, whose futures have been determined since birth. But the turbulent events in their childhood years change the natural progression of things – and shape the characters of the men they will become.

Their roads to manhood follow vastly different routes, but both learn crucial lessons along the way: lessons that will serve them well in future years.

Discovering that the enemy is not always a stranger is a harsh lesson indeed; the realisation that a trusted kinsman can turn traitor is the harshest lesson of all.

The story takes us from the kingdoms of Mercia and Wessex to the Norse lands stretching north from Denmark to the Arctic Circle and east to the Baltic Sea. We glimpse the Court of Charles the Bald of West Francia and journey to the holy city of Rome.

And through it all, the two boys move ever closer to their destinies.


Genre:  Norse & Icelandic
Approx pages:  439


Shadow of the Raven was read and evaluated by Chill's readers against the following...

Were the characters strong and engaging?
 Was the book well written?
Did the story / plot have you turning the page to find out what happened next?
Was the ending satisfying?
Would you recommend to someone who reads this kind of story?





Shadow of the Raven has also received...









Wednesday, 31 October 2018

Cover of the MONTH October - Swords of the King by Charlene Newcomb



Book Cover of the Month

October

Swords of the King





HUGE thanks to  Designer, Cathy Helms from Avalon Graphics for selecting this month's cover of the Month.





Swords of the King is automatically put forward for Cover of the Year 2018.



All books receiving a Chill with a Readers' Award in November will automatically be considered for Book Cover of the Month – November.